27th Feb 2015, 5:20 AM in The Rite of Serfdom

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[[Dódr is speaking from off-panel.]] / Dódr: Harrumph! What do you plead? / Kel: N-not guilty, your venerabablenessessess.
[[Dódr is speaking from off-panel.]] / Dódr: Kangra Rotskivvensdottir, you stand accused of attempting to hinder the work of the Office of Rites, and of complicity after the fact in your sister's reckless abandonment of her ritual duties. What do you plead? / Kangra: Not guilty. / Ottar: So! This lawman, he is ill news?
[[Dódr is speaking from off-panel.]] / Dódr: We will now hear opening statements from counsel for the prosecution, Fafnir Shieldbiter. / Isolde: He will twist the skin on your arm until it prickles.
Fafnir: Ladies and gentlemen, your venerablenesses... The charges against the accused are serious indeed. They upset the very fabric of our society.
[[Fafnir is speaking from off-panel.]] / Fafnir: The Shrine and the Rite are the props*) of our society, defining who we are. in the past, improper use of the Shrine has led to division and war. / Abúi: Is this going to take long? / / [[Fafnir is speaking from off-panel. Kel looks on dejectedly. Kangra tries to console.]] / Fafnir: The Rite determines who can and cannot be a citizen - who can be entrusted with the rights and responsibilities of a gnomian adult: who can use magic, own underground property, partake in the, uh, high elven mysteries.... Who can breed. / / Footnote: *) As underground dwellers, Gnomes use the word "prop" where we would say "cornerstone". Without any pejorative connotations. Props are important.
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Author Notes:

Reinder Dijkhuis 27th Feb 2015, 5:20 AM edit delete
Reinder Dijkhuis
*) As underground dwellers, Gnomes use the word "prop" where we would say "cornerstone". Without any pejorative connotations. Props are important.

Note also that India and China aren't that often heard about in the Gnomian Republic, so the concept we know as the Indian or Chinese Burn wouldn't be refered to by that name.

Originally published on June 28, 2004.